Syzygium cumini

/Syzygium cumini

Syzygium cumini

Jambolan Plum

syzygium cumini
Syzygium cumini (Wikipedia)
"Jamun" redirects here. For the dessert popular in Indian cuisine, see Gulab Jamun.
Syzygium cumini
Syzygium cumini Bra30.png
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Myrtales
Family: Myrtaceae
Genus: Syzygium
Species: S. cumini
Binomial name
Syzygium cumini
(L.) Skeels.
Synonyms
  • Calyptranthes caryophyllifolia Willd.
  • Calyptranthes cumini (L.) Pers.
  • Calyptranthes cuminodora Stokes
  • Calyptranthes jambolana (Lam.) Willd.
  • Calyptranthes jambolifera Stokes
  • Calyptranthes oneillii Lundell
  • Caryophyllus corticosus Stokes
  • Caryophyllus jambos Stokes
  • Eugenia calyptrata Roxb. ex Wight & Arn.
  • Eugenia caryophyllifolia Lam.
  • Eugenia cumini (L.) Druce
  • Eugenia djouat Perrier
  • Eugenia jambolana Lam.
  • Eugenia jambolifera Roxb. ex Wight & Arn.
  • Eugenia obovata Poir.
  • Eugenia obtusifolia Roxb.
  • Eugenia tsoi Merr. & Chun
  • Jambolifera chinensis Spreng.
  • Jambolifera coromandelica Houtt.
  • Jambolifera pedunculata Houtt.
  • Myrtus corticosa Spreng.
  • Myrtus cumini L.
  • Myrtus obovata (Poir.) Spreng.
  • Syzygium caryophyllifolium (Lam.) DC.
  • Syzygium jambolanum (Lam.) DC.
  • Syzygium obovatum (Poir.) DC.
  • Syzygium obtusifolium (Roxb.) Kostel.

Syzygium cumini, known as jambul, jambolan, jamblang or jamun, is an evergreen tropical tree in the flowering plant family Myrtaceae. Syzygium cumini is native to the Indian Subcontinent and adjoining regions of Southeast Asia. The species ranges across India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Indonesia.[citation needed] The name of the fruit is sometimes mistranslated as blackberry, which is a different fruit in an unrelated family. Syzygium cumini has been spread overseas from India by Indian emigrants and at present is common in former tropical British colonies.

The tree was introduced to Florida, United States in 1911 by the USDA, and is also now commonly grown in Suriname, Guyana and Trinidad and Tobago. In Brazil, where it was introduced from India during Portuguese colonization, it has dispersed spontaneously in the wild in some places, as its fruits are eagerly sought by various native birds such as thrushes, tanagers and the great kiskadee. This species is considered an invasive in Hawaii, United States. It is also illegal to grow, plant or transplant in Sanibel, Florida.

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By |2016-12-23T18:57:07+08:00December 23rd, 2016|0 Comments

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